All posts filed under: Teaching

Review of Evernote

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Advice / Teaching

I am writing this post from Evernote, a note-taking app/software and organizational system. I had tried out Evernote a few years ago, when I got my iPad, but didn’t really see the practical utility; I was using it as a glorified legal pad. This seems to be a bit of a trend– academics try Evernote without considering its full utility only to be shocked by its awesomeness years later. On the sage recommendation of Prof. Suzanne Edwards, I gave […]

Why You Should Consider Rare Book School

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Advice / Teaching

I just spent a week at Rare Book School—a program based at UVA that offers book-related courses to scholars, collectors, librarians, booksellers, etc—learning about the principles and best practices of scholarly editing. It was an incredible, valuable, and exhausting experience, and I’ve written a more extensive blog post about the ins and outs of the program elsewhere. But, I wanted to take a few minutes to put this experience in the specific context of our […]

Teacher Development: Learning about learning and helping others learn

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Lehigh Culture & Community / Teaching

Alicia: Like many teaching fellows in the English department, my primary background is in English. I have taken classes and done work outside of English departments but I’m sure that over time I’ve slowly adopted some English-specific habits or ways of looking at the world. You may notice that your students, who often hail from disciplines other than English, have slightly different ways of looking at the world. This is splendid, but challenging. I turned […]

Summer Reading & the First-Year English Classroom

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Lehigh Culture & Community / Teaching

Laura: Every year, the incoming first-year students have a book to read in preparation for discussion groups and related activities, all intended to create a shared experience to immediately bring the students together and make them feel part of Lehigh. These books are chosen by the Summer Reading Committee, which meets several times every Spring to read and discuss prospective texts. We start out with dozens of books, mostly selected by Allison Ragon, the Assistant […]

Contingent Labor: Thoughts from our Colleagues, Part I

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Teaching

Yesterday’s Contingent Labor Panel, part of Jenna Lay’s Job Market panel series, featured four of our Lehigh colleagues, either current students or recent graduates. Colleen Martell, Rebecca Martin, Nicole Batchelor and George Mote have a variety of experiences in the adjuncting world, and they each offered advice for getting adjuncting jobs, advice for planning an exit strategy, a picture of the realities of the contingent labor market, and most surprisingly, the benefits and even pleasures to […]